Welcome Reception for N. Scott Momaday

Please join the English Department in welcoming N. Scott Momaday, Visiting Professor of Creative Writing & Native American Literature, on Wednesday, September 3rd from 1:00-3:00 pm at the UNM Faculty & Staff Club.

N. Scott Momaday is a globally-recognized and celebrated author from the Kiowa Nation. Since publishing his first novel, House Made of Dawn, Momaday has received numerous awards for his writing including the Pulitzer Prize, the National Medal of Arts, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Premio Letterario Internazionale “Mondello,” Italy’s highest literary award. UNESCO named him as an Artist for Peace in 2003

Support for this event also provided by the Institute for American Indian Research and the Taos Summer Writers’ Conference.

 

Momaday Reception

Faculty Members–Call for Spring Methods Wkshp or Summer Institute Proposals

UNM Faculty members, are you interested in leading either a spring workshop or summer institute for 2014-15? These are both usually co-taught either with a faculty member at another consortium or with a colleague from UNM. The proposals will be due in August (more details to follow), in the meantime, please look over the past workshops and institutes as well as who your NCAIS faculty colleagues at other member institutions might be at the NCAIS homepage: http://www.newberry.org/newberry-consortium-american-indian-studies. A brief explanation of the programs follows here.

The spring methodology workshops can take place at the Newberry Library or at the member institution. For example, last year’s explored UNLV’s archives on Native gaming and a previous workshop was held at Harvard’s Peabody Museum. Perhaps it is time for one at the CSWR or the Maxwell Museum. What about a workshop on Indian Law or Art in the SW? For past workshops, see http://www.newberry.org/past-ncais-workshops

The 4-week institutes have traditionally been held at the Newberry during the summer and are generally structured as seminars with shared readings and usually time for working on research projects. The topics have ranged from this year’s “Recording the Native Americas: Indigenous Speech, Representation, and the Politics of Writing” to “Indigenous and Settler Histories of Place and Power.” Here is a link to past institutes: http://www.newberry.org/past-ncais-summer-institutes

Three of your colleagues, have taught in the NCAIS programs. Please feel free to contact them if you have any questions:
Spring Workshop & Summer Institute: Dr. Erin Debenport (Anthro) current UNM/NCAIS liaison erindeb@unm.edu
Summer institute:
Dr. Jennifer Denetdale (Am. Studies) jdenet@unm.edu
Dr. Cathleen Cahill (History) cdcahill@unm.edu

Kate Morris “At the Limits of History: Alan Michelson, Robert Smithson, and the (Post) Colonial Landscape”

The UNM College of Fine Arts and Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and Research Center Modern American Art and Culture Scholar Exchange presents a lecture by
Kate Morris
“At the Limits of History: Alan Michelson, Robert Smithson, and the (Post) Colonial Landscape”

5:30 PM
Wednesday, April 16

UNM Art Museum
Kate Morris is an Associate Professor of Art History at Santa Clara University. She earned her MA in Art History from the University of New Mexico, and her PhD in Art History from Columbia University. She is the co-editor of the forthcoming, Native Art Now! Developments in Contemporary Native American Art Since 1992, which features more than twenty original essays on contemporary Native American art. She is currently a Scholar in Residence at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center in Santa Fe, where she is writing a single-author book, Shifting Grounds: Framing the (Post) Colonial Landscape in Contemporary Native American Art.

This lecture is sponsored by the College of Fine Arts, UNMAM, and the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and Research Center.

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Summer Seminar Call for Applications, Due April 11

GRAD STUDENTS: CALL FOR APPLICATIONS UNM-NCAIS SUMMER SEMINAR: *The deadline is April 11* (application details below) We hope you will apply for this incredible opportunity. Note, travel and housing expenses are paid for through the consortium membership! _RECORDING THE NATIVE AMERICAS: INDIGENOUS SPEECH, REPRESENTATION, AND THE POLITICS OF WRITING_ At the Newberry Library, Chicago Monday, July 7, 2014 to Friday, August 1, 2014 Led by Dr. Ellen Cushman and Dr. Rocío Quispe-Agnoli, Michigan State University Departing from typical constructions of systems of communication and the notions of “literacy” at large, this seminar examines the relationship between Indigenous languages of the Americas and the politics of their writing before and after the arrival of the Europeans in 1492. This seminar explores scholarship in native Americas, indigenous language, and studies of colonialism with three questions in mind: (a) how has the acquisition of alphabetic script impacted (Latin) American indigenous communities, primarily its effects on identities, languages, and cultural institutions;(b) what knowledge is produced today about these communities and their changing responses to what they consider local and global languages and identities; and (c) how have indigenous communities used global networks to advance their own ideas regarding cultural maintenance and language preservation? Framed in ongoing discussions of decolonizing thought, we discuss several forms of writing, record keeping and representational systems, tracing the long history of meaning making in the Americas. We pay special attention to Andean and Iroquoian systems of representation as examples of key moments of resistance to the alphabetic influence and the civilizing force of the letter. Along the way, we highlight the methodological difficulties of removing an alphabetic lens to see writing systems in their own right. We encourage applicants interested in indigenous meaning making practices no matter the discipline: Humanities students can find ample opportunity to study visual, material, and symbolic representations; History students can explore the tensions of colonial and indigenous struggles for making and disseminating knowledge; and archeology and Anthropology students will be introduced to a wide range of material forms of representation and will explore their value; students of English, Linguistics, American Studies, and Latin American Studies will have the opportunity to study visual and written rhetorical expression of Indigenous authors across the hemisphere and find overlooked links among their works. Students will propose and undertake research using the Newberry Library’s collections (and, if applicable, artifacts from the collections the Field Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute) and will write an original research paper to be presented in a conference at the conclusion of the seminar. Participants will be encouraged to either incorporate their findings in the dissertation projects and/or to revise their papers for publication in academic journals of their field. Housing will be provided for free at Canterbury Court Apartments and a maximum of $500 travel expenses will be reimbursed to all participants. Each NCAIS institution is entitled to one slot to the summer institute, which will have a maximum of eighteen participants. Send your application material to Dr. Erin Debenport, UNM’s faculty liaison at erindeb@unm.edu or to Department of Anthropology MSC01-1040 ***by April 11th, 2014*** To Apply please send 1. a letter of application stating why you hope to attend and how this workshop will help further your research interests and program, 2. a short 2 page c.v. 3. _2_ letters of recommendation from faculty members familiar with your work Benefits of the NCAIS summer seminar: *travel and lodging in Chicago are paid for by the consortium *the opportunity to take a class from top scholars in the field of Native studies *an opportunity to network with graduate students and professors from the other top-flight universities in the consortium *the institute overlaps with the NCAIS graduate student conference, so students can also use the opportunity to present a paper to their NCAIS peers as well as the NCIAS faculty liaisons who will be in attendance. *networking opportunities with the scholars at the Newberry for the summer (often top scholars in Native and indigenous studies) * an individual carrel at the Newberry Library and access to their incredibly collections in indigenous culture. *a month in Chicago. For more information, please see the Newberry website: URL: http://www.newberry.org/07072014-recording-native-americas For UNM-NCAIS, see http://unmncais.unm.edu/

2014 Graduate Student Conference

NEWBERRY CONSORTIUM IN AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES
CALL FOR PAPERS
Graduate Student Conference
July 18 – 19, 2014, The Newberry
Graduate students from NCAIS member institutions are invited to present papers in any academic field relating to American Indian and Indigenous Studies. We encourage the submission of proposals for papers that examine a wide variety of subjects relating to American Indian and Indigenous history and culture broadly conceived. The conference will take place in conjunction with the NCAIS summer institute on July 7 – August 1, 2014. Faculty liaisons in attendance have agreed to provide feedback on individual presentations relevant to their expertise. First-time presenters are encouraged. To propose a paper, please send up to one-page proposal, a statement explaining the relationship of the paper to your other work, and a brief C.V. to mcnickle@newberry.org.
The deadline for submission is June 2, 2014.
If you are interested in proposing a paper and have questions, please contact conference coordinator and Director of the McNickle Center, Dr. Patricia Marroquin Norby at norbyp@newberry.org.
NCAIS is unable to provide funds for travel or lodging, but can assist in locating discounted accommodations.
If you would like to receive announcements and updates about NCAIS programs or to subscribe to the NCAIS mailing list, send an email request to mcnickle@newberry.org

NCAIS Graduate Summer Institute

Recording the Native Americas

Indigenous Speech, Representation, and the Politics of Writing
NCAIS Summer Institute
Monday, July 7, 2014 to Friday, August 1, 2014

TFL

Led by Profs. Ellen Cushman and Rocío Quispe-Agnoli, Michigan State University

Departing from typical constructions of systems of communication and the notions of “literacy” at large, this seminar examines the relationship between Indigenous languages of the Americas and the politics of their writing before and after the arrival of the Europeans in 1492. This seminar explores scholarship in native Americas, indigenous language, and studies of colonialism with three questions in mind: (a) how has the acquisition of alphabetic script impacted (Latin) American indigenous communities, primarily its effects on identities, languages, and cultural institutions;(b) what knowledge is produced today about these communities and their changing responses to what they consider local and global languages and identities; and (c) how have indigenous communities used global networks to advance their own ideas regarding cultural maintenance and language preservation?

Framed in ongoing discussions of decolonizing thought, we discuss several forms of writing, record keeping and representational systems, tracing the long history of meaning making in the Americas. We pay special attention to Andean and Iroquoian systems of representation as examples of key moments of resistance to the alphabetic influence and the civilizing force of the letter. Along the way, we highlight the methodological difficulties of removing an alphabetic lens to see writing systems in their own right.

While primarily drawing upon the Newberry’s extensive collections, especially the Edward Ayer and the Everett Graff collections, we will also visit the Field Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute, to contextualize Americas Indigenous writing and literacy in the larger America and global contexts of the history of writing.

We encourage applicants interested in indigenous meaning making practices no matter the discipline: Humanities students can find ample opportunity to study visual, material, and symbolic representations; History students can explore the tensions of colonial and indigenous struggles for making and disseminating knowledge; and archeology and Anthropology students will be introduced to a wide range of material forms of representation and will explore their value; students of English, Linguistics, American Studies, and Latin American Studies will have the opportunity to study visual and written rhetorical expression of Indigenous authors across the hemisphere and find overlooked links among their works.

Students will propose and undertake research using the Newberry’s collections (and, if applicable, artifacts from the collections of the museums mentioned above) and will write an original research paper to be presented in a conference at the conclusion of the seminar. Participants will be encouraged to either incorporate their findings in the dissertation projects and/or to revise their papers for publication in academic journals of their field.

Cost and registration information:

Each NCAIS institution is entitled to one slot to the summer institute, which will have a maximum of eighteen participants. The selection process of each member institution’s NCAIS Summer Institute participant is according to the individual program needs and existing protocols of the member institution. Housing will be provided for free at Canterbury Court Apartments and a maximum of $500 travel expenses will be reimbursed to all participants. Students will also receive $500 stipend. Students should apply directly to their NCAIS Faculty Liaison. Watch this site for the deadline and application information.

 

http://www.newberry.org/07072014-recording-native-americas

Walter Echo-Hawk at UNM Law School March 3rd

 

Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee) is a Native American speaker, author, and attorney.  He will be speaking from his new book, “In The Light of Justice: Human Rights in Native North America”

Monday March 3rd, 2014
5:00pm to 6:00pm

UNM Law School: Room 2402
(Parking in Lot L)
Book Signing Afterwards

Sponsorship Provided By:
UNM Native American Studies, Alfonso Ortiz Center, UNM School of Law-Law & Indigenous Peoples Program and Tribal Law Journal

For more information or questions please contact: Dr. Robin Minthorn at rminthorn@unm.edu

 

 

NCAIS Spring Workshop in Research Methods

Betting on Indian Country

Indian Gaming in the Archives
NCAIS Spring Workshop in Research Methods
Wednesday, March 19, 2014 to Friday, March 21, 2014University of Nevada at Las Vegas
Led by Profs. William Bauer, Department of History, University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Erin Debenport, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico
http://www.newberry.org/03192014-betting-indian-country

UNM Indigenous Book & Authors Festival This Week!

Indigenous Book & Authors Festival 2014

Authenticity  &  Indigeneity

February 20-21, 2014

The University of New Mexico Student Union Building

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Click on the link below for the full schedule!

http://www.unm.edu/~ifair/

NCAIS Graduate Workshop in Research Methods “Betting on Indian Country: Indian Gaming in the Archives” March 19th – 21st 2014

Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies (NCAIS) Graduate Workshop in Research Methods “Betting on Indian Country: Indian Gaming in the Archives” March 19th – 21st 2014 / University of Nevada, Las Vegas

TO APPLY: Please send a letter of application stating why you hope to attend and how this workshop will help further your research interests and program, a short 2 page c.v., and two letters of recommendation from faculty members who are familiar with your work to our NCAIS faculty liaison, Dr. Erin Debenport. Her email address is erindeb@unm.edu and her mailing address is Department of Anthropology MSC01-1040, Anthropology 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131

This research workshop will examine Indian gaming in the context of gambling’s deep and global history. The workshop will be hosted by the University of Nevada at Las Vegas’ Special Collections and the Center of Gaming Research. UNLV’s Gaming Archives feature the Taxe Collection (more than 700 fictional and non-fictional records pertaining to gaming that date to the 19th century), trade publications and manuscript collections pertaining to casinos and resorts throughout the world (such as Mandalay Bay and the Sands). Readings and discussion will consider issues relating to the history, culture and politics of Indian gaming. Research in the archives will then enable students to place Indian gaming in comparative and global contexts. Students may pursue topics related to law and policy; the development of the service economy; comparative histories of gaming (e.g., Las Vegas, riverboats, and Atlantic City); gaming and literature; casino resort development; and tourism. led by William Bauer, PhD, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Erin Debenport, PhD, University of New Mexico Each NCAIS institution is entitled to one slot in the three-day workshop. Students may participate in the workshop as part of an introduction to critical methodologies in American Indian Studies. Students should apply directly to their NCAIS Faculty Liaison by February 3, 2014. Housing will be provided and participants will be reimbursed up to $500 for travel.

For more information, including a preliminary book list see: http://www.newberry.org/03192014-betting-indian-country